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Deepwater Horizon Spill Still Causing Damage

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The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill happened nearly two years ago. Since that time, there has been notable improvement in cleaning up the tremendous amount of oil that spilled into the Gulf, washed up onshore, or in some cases, lingered just below the waves.

The cleanup effort was aggressive during and in the months following the spill. But now, state officials say that the pace has largely slowed despite an alarming amount of oil that still remains in the wetlands.

“There are still some 200 miles of oiled coast two years following the spill. That’s not acceptable,” said Garrett Graves, the top coastal adviser to Gov. Bobby Jindal.

The issue as it stands is that the state is waiting for the U.S. Coast Guard to demand BP clean up the lingering oil. But the company says it can’t continue cleanup in many areas without the Coast Guard giving the green light. Additionally it says, in some instances, the cleanup may lead to more damage than it would by leaving the oil to dissipate naturally.

For the general public, it’s difficult to discern where blame should be placed and where to look for a solution to the problem. What is known, is, that while cleanup effort in some places is still aggressive, a massive amount of oil still remains. Moreover, there is likely to be more tar balls that continue to wash ashore.

According to Graves, the state is still trying to get BP to come up with a long term plan to purge the coast of the oil residue from the spill. And next the Coast Guard must agree to oversee the plan is carried out.

Spill's Lasting Effects

Utilizing an ultraviolet light, geologist James “Rip” Kirby has found evidence that oil is still present, and maybe even a threat to beachgoers. In fact, biologists are finding signs of lingering damage throughout the gulf from the bottom of the food chain to the top. You can read more about it on the TampaBay.com Web site.

Visit BusinessByTheBeach.com to read about BP’s agreement in principle, town hall meetings and more regarding the oil spill.

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